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Alabama state Democrat says near-total abortion bill passage 'raped women last night'

Updated 10:08 AM ET, Wed May 15, 2019

Washington (CNN) - A Democratic state senator from Alabama equated a state bill that would ban abortion with no exceptions for rape and incest to the rape of Alabama women.

A day after the Republican-led Senate voted 25-6 to pass HB 314, state Sen. Bobby Singleton told CNN's Alisyn Camerota on "New Day" early Wednesday, "I think that we raped women last night."

"We made women of Alabama the model of the new Roe v. Wade. I think that this is just a horrible bill," Singleton continued.

Later Wednesday, Alabama GOP Gov. Kay Ivey signed the bill into law.

The law would punish doctors who perform abortions with up to 99 years in prison and does not allow exceptions for cases of rape and incest -- making it the most restrictive abortion measure in the country.

"I hate to think the fact that if someone would rape my daughter at 12 years old ... that is just sad to tell my daughter that she had to carry that baby for nine months here in the state of Alabama and look that rapist in the face for the rest of her life. I just couldn't take it as a father, so I had to speak up for women all over the country, for the women in the state of Alabama because this was just wrong," said Singleton, who voted against the bill.

The bill's Republican sponsors said the intent of the legislation is to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court case legalizing abortion.

Singleton said on "New Day" that Alabama does not have the money to fight expected legal challenges to the law. He pleaded with Ivey to veto the bill or introduce an executive amendment allowing exemptions for rape and incest. On Wednesday afternoon, Ivey signed the bill and noted it may be unenforceable due to the Supreme Court's ruling in Roe v. Wade. At the same time, she called the legislation "a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God."

Alabama's Senate and House, however, have a large enough Republican majority to override a governor's veto. The bill would not take effect until six months after becoming law.


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